Phys.org-News and Articles on Science

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Accessed on 18 July 2019, 2010 UTC.

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Mathematics

Illusive patterns in math explained by ideas in physics

Patterns appear widely throughout nature and math, from the Fibonacci spirals of sea shells to the periodicity of crystals. But certain math problems can sometimes trick the human solver into seeing a pattern, but then, out …

Condensed Matter

Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers led by the University of Michigan.

China’s plans to solve the mysteries of the moon

Fifty years ago, on July 20, 1969, the world watched as Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon. Since then, space agencies around the globe have sent rovers to Mars, probes to the furthest reaches of our galaxy and beyond, yet …

Mass estimated for two binary pulsars

By performing timing observations, an international group of astronomers has measured the mass of two binary millisecond pulsars designated PSR J1949+3106 and PSR J1950+2414. The results could be essential in order to unveil …

Great apes found to bond when watching videos together

A pair of researchers affiliated with Duke University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found that great apes tend to bond with one another when they watch a video together. In their paper published …

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 Medical Xpress

 Tech Xplore

Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans

Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a Rutgers-led …

Cassini explores ring-like formations around Titan’s lakes

Using observations from the international Cassini spacecraft, scientists have explored the ring-like mounds that wrap around some of the pools found at the poles of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The study reveals more about …

The ABC of ribosome recycling

Ribosomes, the essential machinery used for protein synthesis is recycled after each one round of translation. An enzyme called ABCE1 is responsible for this process and turns out to be remarkably plastic as LMU biophysicists …

Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells

Low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells in healthy tissue, scientists have discovered. Researchers at the Wellcome …

Heat wave forecast prompts Chicago public housing checks

Public housing officials in Chicago were planning wellbeing checks on residents as the heat and humidity are expected to mount to dangerous levels as part of a wave of sweltering weather covering a substantial portion of …

The top five strangest poisons that can kill you

There are some crazy poisons in this world of ours, and they’re often found in things you’d least expect. In this week’s episode of Reactions, we break down our top five strangest poisons.

Coaching scientists to play well together

When scientists from different disciplines collaborate—as is increasingly necessary to confront the complexity of challenging research problems—interpersonal tussles often arise. One scientist may accuse another of stealing …

NASA’s Webb Telescope shines with American ingenuity

To send humans to the Moon 50 years ago, an entire nation rose to the challenge. Surmounting countless hurdles, inventing new technologies while staring into the face of the unknown, NASA successfully pioneered multiple lunar …

How the women of NASA made their mark on the space program

The Civil Rights Act had just passed and the slide rule was giving way to computers when Frances “Poppy” Northcutt arrived at NASA’s Houston campus in 1965, eager to join the space race. But her job title stunned her: “computress.”

Researchers study impact of information on voters

Voter information campaigns don’t shape voter behavior, according to an analysis of data combined from studies independently conducted but coordinated by researchers working in six developing countries. The study, co-authored …

Mapping the moon and worlds beyond

In 1972, it took an astronaut going on a spacewalk to do what Lynn Carter now can do with a few mouse clicks over lunch.

Daily coffee doesn’t affect cancer risk

Drinking coffee does not change a person’s risk of being diagnosed with or dying from cancer, a new QIMR Berghofer study has found.

New frog species discovered

UCF student Veronica Urgiles has helped describe two new frog species discovered in Ecuador, and she named one of them after one of her professors.

Spread-changing orders and deletions affect stock prices

The first rule on the stock market is to buy low and sell high. Economists are well aware of how this behaviour changes the prices of stocks, but in reality, trades alone don’t tell the whole story. Parties like banks and …

Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections

Researchers in the group of Jan Michiels (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. This finding is important, as sleepy cells are often responsible for the stubbornness …

Simulations fix the cracks in magnetic mirrors

When ring-shaped electromagnets are set up in linear arrangements, they can produce magnetic fields resembling a tube with a cone at each end—a structure that repels charged particles entering one cone back along their …

Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Just as lions are apex predators on land, lionfish in Florida are an underwater force to be reckoned with. The biggest threat they pose, however, is not their venomous spines. It is the alarming speed and ferocity with which …

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