Phys.org-Articles on Science

Welcome to the “Phys.org” update from Hawaii Science Digest.

Views expressed in this science and technology news update are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by “Phys.org.”  This report is an official publication of the Space X Network.

Accessed on 17 January 2020, 2155 UTC.

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https://phys.org/

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Spotlight science news

Consumer & Gadgets

Thin-film identification tags for transferring data to touchscreen devices

Today, countless electronic devices have touchscreens, including smart phones, tablets and smart home appliances. Touchscreen interfaces have become some of the most common means for users to communicate with and browse through …

Plants & Animals

What is an endangered species?

What makes for an endangered species classification isn’t always obvious.

Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity

Specially designed vacuum suction units allow humans to climb walls. Scientists have developed a suction unit that can be used on rough surfaces, no matter how textured, and that has applications in the development of climbing …

A new method for dating ancient earthquakes

Constraining the history of earthquakes produced by bedrock fracturing is important for predicting seismic activity and plate tectonic evolution. In a new study published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports Jan 17, 2020, …

Faking emotions at work does more harm than good

The adage “Fake it until you make it”—the idea that someone can fake a positive attitude to elicit real-life benefits—often backfires when used with co-workers, according to a study led by a University of Arizona researcher.

 Medical Xpress

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes
Second person dies from SARS-linked virus in China

 Tech Xplore

Energy & Green Tech
Green is the new black

Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections

Τhe ability of the immune system to fight off bacterial, viral and other invading agents in the gut differs between individuals. However, the biological mechanism by which this happens is not well understood, but at least …

New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues

If you have a dog, hopefully you’re lucky enough to know that they are highly attuned to their owners and can readily understand a wide range of commands and gestures. But are these abilities innate or are they exclusively …

Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering, and no human voices, …

XMM-Newton discovers scorching gas in Milky Way’s halo

ESA’s XMM-Newton has discovered that gas lurking within the Milky Way’s halo reaches far hotter temperatures than previously thought and has a different chemical make-up than predicted, challenging our understanding of our …

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but …

Teens feel the heat of climate change

In 2017, when the drought in Cape Town was at its worst in over a century, aid organisation Gift of the Givers made an urgent call to South Africans to help farmers; suicide rates, amongst both small- and large-scale farmers, …

Air France-KLM chief warns carbon taxes could backfire

Air France-KLM chief executive Ben Smith said Friday that imposing carbon taxes on ticket prices could prove counterproductive, hindering efforts by airlines to buy more fuel-efficient planes that could significantly reduce …

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate

Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are among the most important building blocks for synthesis products that are needed to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, during the usual chemical reactions …

Molecules move faster on a rough terrain

Roughness, the presence of irregularities on a surface, is commonly associated with slower motion and stickiness. This is true at different length scales: at human size (1 meter), it takes longer to walk along a path that …

Hands off our grasslands

In the north eastern Free State, a 60 km green corridor is being created that will link the upper Wilge Protected Environment to the Sneeuwberg.

Internet use reduces study skills in university students

Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect …

Programmable nests for cells

Using DNA, small silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed novel programmable nanocomposites that can be tailored to various applications and programmed …

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome

Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent …

Mysterious little red jellies: A case of mistaken identity

Little red jellies are commonplace near the deep seafloor in Monterey Bay and around the world. Most of them are small—less than five centimeters (two inches) across—and a ruddy red color, but we know little else about …

Using waste carbon dioxide to separate metals from ores

A combined team of researchers from the University of Lyon and the University of Turin has developed a way to use waste CO2 to separate metals used in products. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the …

Sea lions yawn due to anxiety

Researchers have analysed these animals for 14 months, concluding that the frequency of their yawns increases immediately after a social conflict among members of the group.

The war on waste pickers

The man in the tattered shirt, biceps bulging as he pulls an enormous bag of waste behind him on a trolley. The blaring horns as cars slide by, annoyed at the intrusion in their lane. The furtive WhatsApp messages on community …

Changing the leopard’s spots

Since wildlife poaching in Africa became a critical conservation issue, Chinese people have been portrayed as ruthless in the apparent pursuit of wildlife body parts. The Africa-China Reporting Project in Wits Journalism …

Battling longer, more intense fire seasons

Fires in Australia have been burning for months. At least 28 people and hundreds of thousands of animals have died, and more than 15 million acres have been destroyed as firefighters work to squelch the blaze. Penn doctoral …

New astronomical instrument on the hunt for exoplanets

At the highest point of the Quinlan mountains, overlooking the Sonoran Desert as it stretches across southern Arizona, NEID (pronounced like “fluid”) recently collected its first observations, known colloquially by astronomers …

We need to modernize how we measure national wealth

I recently tried an experiment. I changed several light bulbs, and since one required a little rewiring, I sent my wife (also known as the majority shareholder) a bill for $110.50 (plus GST). In return, she sent me a bill …

Living yoga for the mind

Plants in the office are not there just to look pretty. They can lead to increased productivity, as well as improved mental health for workers.

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Until next time,
Russ Roberts
https://hawaiisciencedaily.com (breaking science and technology news).

 

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